Aerobic Systems

To better assist you we have prepared some helpful information and relevant images to educate you about your aerobic system and how to prolong its life and keep it running. We also offer a maintenance program to get the most out of the life of your system.

Aerobic System Parts

There are several main parts to your aerobic system and I'm here to go over a few with you today. The first of which is the tank itself which may vary depending on age and manufacturer but consists of three chambers or three separate tanks. The first tank is the trash tank where primary settling takes place and treatment begins, this tank is generally between 300-500 gallons. The second tank is the aerobic tank which is where air is added to allow a different bacteria to live and further treat the sewage, this tank is generally between 500-750 gallons (the water leaving this tank should have a clarity of at least 24"). The final tank is the pump tank where chlorine is added (some units have a UV light option) to kill the bacteria to finish the treatment and the resulting water is either sprinkled on the lawn or dosed into the ground using a special tubing.

Trash tank and when to pump

Your trash tank is much smaller than a conventional septic in most aerobic systems and thus will need to be pumped much more frequent generally 1-3 years depending on use. The only ways to truly know if your aerobic unit needs pumped is to either pump it out and visually inspect the depth of the sludge or to use a profiling tool to measure the sludge depth without removing the water on top first.

State Resources

Trash tank and when to pump

Aerobic or Aeration Tank

Your aerobic tank is the middle stage in treatment. In this tank air is added to the bottom and this allows a different bacteria to live and the sewage to be further processed which can really be seen with the clarity of the water leaving the tank. The water leaving your aeriation tank should have around 24" of visibility. If its lower than you may have an issue with a weak or dead compressor or a sludge issue.

Pump Tank and Chorinator

Your aerobic tank is the middle stage in treatment. In this tank air is added to the bottom and this allows a different bacteria to live and the sewage to be further processed which can really be seen with the clarity of the water leaving the tank. The water leaving your aeriation tank should have around 24" of visibility. If its lower than you may have an issue with a weak or dead compressor or a sludge issue.

In your pump tank your system will have some way of killing the bacteria from the prior two tanks by means of either chlorine tablets, liquid bleach, or a UV light setup. If the bacteria isn't killed going into the pump tank for prolonged times the bacteria will produce gasses that can corrode the electrical contacts in the tank and in the control panel causing a fire risk and pump damage. The chlorine levels should be closely monitored in this tank for those reasons and so should the sludge levels be monitored to insure that levels do not reach high enough to enter the pump and cause mechanical or electrical damage. If your system is equipped with a tablet chlorinator it is necessary to use aerobic tablets and not pool tablets. The pool tablets are too strong and will raise levels high enough to kill the vegetation that your unit disperses water on.